Arts & Entertainment

The Bartlett History Museum collects, preserves and interprets Bartlett's rich heritage and shares it with the community through exhibitions, education, and media in order to increase public awareness, knowledge, and appreciation.

Our mission is to inspire appreciation in our rich local heritage by encouraging understanding and preservation of the history of our township.

Dundee Township is an area where new growth and historic preservation stand side by side. We seek your active involvement in the Historical Society. Your financial support by membership dues, donations, and gifts of time as a volunteer (docent, library aide, special events volunteer, etc.) will allow us to achieve our goals.

The Elgin History Museum is housed in an 1856 landmark building known as Old Main that was once part of the Elgin Academy campus. The building was designed in the Greek Revival style. The museum has a staff that helps welcome visitors to the museum, educates the public about Elgin history and assists with research inquiries.

The Elgin Area Historical Society, which was founded in 1961, is a thriving organization that operates within the museum. The society has a board of directors with a mission that is driven to preserve and educate the community about Elgin history.

Through permanent and changing exhibits, the museum brings to life Elgin’s rich heritage. Permanent exhibits include Elgin National Watch Company, the E. Maude and Carl Parlasca Native American Collection, and Elgin Road Race memorabilia.

Elgin Artspace Lofts, located 40 miles northwest of Chicago's Central Business District at 51 South Spring Street, Elgin, IL 60120, is a project that combines the rehabilitation of an existing structure with a new building.

55 units of affordable live/work space for artists and their families plus 5,874 square feet of retail and community space for arts-friendly businesses and nonprofit organizations

 

 

The natural history collection belonging to Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Lord was first exhibited in the Lords Park Pavilion in 1898. However, it was the Lords' desire that their collection be housed in its own building. In 1904 local architect David E. Postle was contracted to design a building to serve this purpose.
Construction of the current building's central structure began two years later, to be paid for in donations, the largest donation coming from the Lords. When Mr. Lord died in 1906, the center section of the building had been completed as well as the basement of the west wing, at a cost of $9,856. The following year, the metal roof covering the west basement was removed and the west wing was completed. However, after the death of Mr. Lord, interest in the project declined and the north and east wings of the building were not completed as originally planned. Further delays in opening the Museum were caused by breaks in the floor in 1908 and disagreements over hiring a full-time curator. The goal of housing a museum collection was forgotten as the building served as a storage place for hay from 1909-1911, and as the City Dog Pound, with animals being disposed of in the basement, from 1911-1917.
Originally named Lord Memorial Museum, the building finally opened on November 12, 1920 as the Elgin Audubon Museum, the Audubon Society having completed an agreement with the City of Elgin in 1917 to operate the Museum. The Audubon Society was to approve the curator and maintain the exhibits, while the City assumed the finances. The first curator was Charles J. Adkins, who served from 1920-1946, while at the same time working as Parks Caretaker until 1929. The exhibits and display cases, including those made to order by Rhineheimer's of Elgin, were moved from the Pavilion to the Museum; and in 1921 the Zeigler brothers donated additional cases. In 1933 the basement partitions, fireplace and restrooms were added as a government work project (WPA), at a cost of $2745.
When the Elgin Audubon Society disbanded in 1961, the City of Elgin's Department of Public Property and Recreation took over complete operation of the Museum. The Museum's name was changed to the Elgin Public Museum in 1975. Although lacking the balance of model in architectural integrity because the east wing was never built, the Museum was recognized by the National Registry of Historic Places as an example of Neo-Classical architecture, as well as for its local historical significance.
Finally in August of 1998 ground was broken to complete the east wing. The exterior of the east wing was built to match the original building. Architects Dalquist & Lutzow went so far as to match the brick and oolithic limestone detailing. The interior was built to complement the original design while keeping ADA (American's with Disabilities Act) requirements in mind.
The Elgin Public Museum reopened in July of 2000 with a handicapped accessible north entrance, elevator and public restrooms. New exhibits included Exploring the Waterways: The LaSalle Expedition, Nature of Elgin and a hands-on Children's Discovery Room. The Museum Store was expanded as well.
The Elgin Public Museum is now the oldest building in Illinois built expressly as a museum that is still serving that purpose. Its Neo-Classical style of architecture is unmistakable from the front with its two free columns and two square-engaged columns. Inside the Museum, visitors can still experience the beautiful and original oak woodwork, plaster wall ornamentation and ceramic tile floors.

Elgin Symphony Orchestra

The Elgin Symphony Orchestra experience is unmatched for a fun, relaxing, cultural experience. Now in its 65th season and under the direction of new Music Director Andrew Grams, the ESO continues to delight audiences of all ages, year after year. Patrons can enjoy a drink, time with friends and even shopping in the lobby of the Hemmens Cultural Center. After Saturday night performances, the audience is invited to "Mingle with the Musicians" at the local restaurant, Elgin Public House. From start to finish - the ESO brings world class, big city entertainment without the hassles of the big city. Come Experience ESO!

Grand Victoria Casino

Get in on the action! With hot new games, a cool new look and awesome cash prizes, it's all aboard for excitement! We're Rockin' the Boat!

Perched atop the spectacular Fox River, Grand Victoria Casino boasts over 1,100 exciting slots, a countless variety of Vegas-style table games, acclaimed gaming promotions and giveaways, four extraordinary restaurants, including award-winning Buckinghams, and unparalleled customer service. It all makes Grand Victoria Casino the best gaming, dining, and entertainment destination in all of Chicagoland.

Hemmens Cultural Center

The Hemmens Cultural Center offers Chicagoland a 1,200 seat acoustical gem that Harry Belafonte described as a "jewel". With seats no further than 87 feet from the stage and ample leg room, The Hemmens is the ideal venue to enjoy entertainment ranging from local favorites such as The Elgin Symphony Orchestra and Children's Theatre of Elgin to performing legends such as the Oak Ridge Boys, Bob Newhart and BB King. The Hemmens Cultural Center not only boasts a beautiful proscenium theatre, it also has an 11,340 square foot Exhibition Hall, fully equipped banquet kitchen and art gallery. With convenient, ample parking, and easy access from major routes, The Hemmens Cultural Center is ideal for trade shows, performances, conventions and meetings.

Looking for one-of-a-kind treasures that you won't find ANYWHERE else? Try Honey Poo Poo's in East Dundee (inside Artisticology) for * Unique Garden Art w/teacups, saucers and even holiday themed! * Dazzling Boot Bling * Sparkling Zipper Pulls* Wine & Liquor Bottle Lamps * Smushed Wine Bottle Functional Art * Colorful Paintings * Unique Purses * Hand Painted Rocking Horses * Papier Mache Art * Recycled Record Album Clocks & Party Bowls * Treasures with messages (MUST SEE!) * Whimsical hand painted furniture AND SO MUCH MORE!

Judson University

Judson University is a fully accredited, private Christian university of the liberal arts, sciences and professions. Judson offers degrees in more than 50 different majors/minors for traditional, graduate, and adult students. Judson University ranks consistently among the Top-Tier of Regional Colleges in the Midwest by U.S. News and World Report. With an academically challenging environment and encouraging spiritual community, Judson shapes lives that will shape the world. During our academic year, Judson provides chapel for our community at 10 a.m. in Herrick Chapel Monday, Wednesday and Friday. These events are free and open to the public. Each year Judson hosts concerts, recitals, plays, lectures and art galleries from renowned artists and architects on campus for our students. These events are typically open to the public and admission fees and registration may be required. Judson also is home to the World Leaders Forum, an annual event that brings global world leads in the spring. During the school year, Judson offers music lessons to younger students through the Fox Valley Community Music School. During the summer, special sports camps and a music camp are available for area youth.